February Readings #16


Walk in Wisdom – Gleanings from Scripture
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The opening chapters of Leviticus are somewhat startling as we begin to see the
elaborate system of the sacrifices. But here is the Gospel in it its most graphic
form. It is good to note first how each person who brought a sacrifice had to kill
it personally. No one could do it for them. We must see it was OUR hand who
nailed Jesus to the Cross. We must look to Him as though we had brought Him
to Calvary ourselves to die there. We must each see that He is our sacrifice
personally, and no one else can make Him that for us. Note that blood had to
be shed in their place. The sacrifice was in lieu of their own death. They knew
full well this was a substitute. The animal would die so that they would not. So is
Christ the substitute for all who believe, who take Him as such. Killed He was.
Offered up He was. But if I do not take Him as MY substitute by faith, I am still
lost in my sins. But note thirdly how the one who brought the sacrifice had to
“lay his hand on the head” of the offering. Alfred Edersheim tells us that the
words imply that the one making the offering had to rest their whole weight
on the head of the sacrifice. And is this not simply the sweetest picture of that
true and saving faith we are to exercise toward our Savior? We are to rest the
entire weight of our guilt upon Him. The whole of our sin. Our shame, and our
hope and trust. He alone can support us. He alone can bear it all. If one animal
were to have the weight of all a man’s sins – not just those he was confessing at
that time, but the collective weight he would place upon the heads of his
multiple sacrifices over the years – none could ever bear it. But our Redeemer
can – and did! Alone upon that Cross, He took it all. And in the taking of it, let
each who rests the the entire weight of their sin-stained, guilt ridden souls know
of an assurance, that their sins are fully met in Him. Oh what a Sacrifice He is!

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